Print

Plenary Speakers


Plenary Lecture 1: Threats from emerging viruses
Monday, 25 September, 13:00-13:30

Helen Lazear Helen Lazear
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, United States
Biography

Plenary Lecture 2: Virus morphogenesis
Tuesday, 26 September, 8:30-9:00

Richard Kuhn Richard Kuhn
Purdue Institute of Inflammation, United States
Biography

Plenary Lecture 3: Host factors driving the virus life cycle
Tuesday, 26 September, 10:30-11:00

Mohsan Saeed Mohsan Saeed
Rockefeller University, United States
Biography

Plenary Lecture 4: Viral pathogenesis and cancer
Wednesday, 27 September, 8:30-9:00

Jane McKeating Jane McKeating
University of Oxford, United Kingdom
Biography

Plenary Lecture 5: Integrated analysis of human antiviral immune responses
Wednesday, 27 September, 10:30-11:00

Alex Shalek Alex Shalek
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, United States
Biography

Plenary Lecture 6: Vaccine design and development against a highly variable virus
Thursday, 28 September, 8:30-9:00

Dan Barouch Dan Barouch
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, United States
Biography

Plenary Lecture 7: What's next for HCV?
Thursday, 28 September, 10:30-11:00

David Thomas David Thomas
Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, United States
Biography
Implementation of treatment and vaccination to eliminate HCV infection


Panel Q&A: Transmitting the message that HCV research still matters
Thursday, 28 September, 12:00-12:45

Rajen Koshy Rajen Koshy
National Institutes of Health, United States
Biography
Stuart Ray Stuart Ray
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, United States
Biography
Panel Q&A: Transmitting the message that HCV research still matters
HCV is a major killer worldwide, and continues to spread. Curative treatments are transformative, but not a panacea. The study of HCV has revealed previously-unrecognized and broadly-applicable cell biology, innate and adaptive immune mechanisms, and pharmacologic innovations. In addition to the intrinsic value of fundamental research, HCV provides unparalleled opportunity to study human biology, successful and failed immune responses, and viral phylodynamics at multiple scales. In practical terms, ending the HCV epidemic requires improved (scalable) tools for diagnosis, management, and prevention of HCV infection. No major epidemic has been controlled without a vaccine, and there are ample reasons for this rule to apply to HCV - considering that the people most affected tend to have the least access to care.